Front Wheel Bearing Replacement

How to's and Custum Mods
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TOH
Verified Newbie
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:02 am
Location: Mississauga
by TOH » Fri Jan 16, 2009 11:51 pm
Just had to replace the front wheel bearings on my son's 2000 SC2. The bearings are pressed into the steering knuckles and require "special" tooling to complete the task (according to my Saturn manual). I spent $20.00 at MetalSuperMarkets on flat bar and $15.00 at Homely Depot for bolts and made my own version of the tool. My 4 ton bottle jack does all the work. With my tool, you do not need a shop press or anything else to complete the task.

Let me know if I should post the entire procedure, post pictures, etc.

If anyone needs more info or would like to borrow the rig, please feel free to contact me. I live in the Port Credit area.

Regards,

Bob Morgoch
23 Veronica Drive
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
L5G 2B1
905 278-5856

I have posted the info below (5th one down). Sorry guys I didn't realize I could add it to this post.

This document was done with Word. The diagrams are done with Visio and pasted into the Word document. If you wish a copy in the Word format, send me an email or PM with your email address and I can send it to you.

PDF Download Link Added by Slayer


BE WARNED!!!!!!!!


I just replaced the front bearings on the 1999 SW1 I bought for my daughter and ran into an interesting situation. The threads on the hubs were pretty rusty so I luckily chose to buy the replacement hub/bearing kit (about $20.00 more than just the bearing kit). Turns out it was a good thing. If you just buy the bearings, you cannot buy the hubs separately later.

When I pressed the old hub out of the bearing, the inner race of the outer bearing came out of the bearing and remained on the hub. If I was planning to reuse the old hub, I would have been up the creek without a paddle! There is no way to grab hold of the race to pull it off the hub. The only way I could think of to remove it would be to grind through the race to split it open to loosen it enough to remove it. It would be tricky to grind through the bearing race without damaging the hub itself.

Additionally, when I went to press the hub out of the steering knuckle, my socket was up against the inner race of the inner bearing. It blew out just like the outer one did. I simply took it and put it into the outer side so that I could press out the bearing. Without the race there, there is nothing to press on to push out the bearing.

BTY, I used my 20 ton shorty hydraulic jack this time and it was much easier to do the work than my 4 ton jack.

Good Luck!

Bob
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Last edited by TOH on Wed Apr 28, 2010 8:42 pm, edited 3 times in total.

 

Slayer
O6P Staff
Posts: 1568
Joined: Sat Oct 14, 2006 5:33 pm
Location: Hamilton
 
by Slayer » Sat Jan 17, 2009 3:03 pm
yeah post it up, I just did the wheel bearing on my Protege5 but luckily my brother is a mecahnic, and we just used his shop, and his shops $800 tool to remove and re-install the bearing

so a do it yourself version might be a good how to

 

Viperoni
onenut
Posts: 1667
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 10:44 am
Location: B-town, ON
 
by Viperoni » Mon Jan 19, 2009 8:44 am
Please do post up some details on the tool, that's awesome :)

 

slammedsl1
6th Planet Addict
Posts: 417
Joined: Wed Oct 18, 2006 9:24 pm
Location: Brampton, Ontario, Canada
 
by slammedsl1 » Wed Jan 21, 2009 7:13 am
Yeah, post up!

I did mine last summer and I just used an old hub with everything and swapped that in.

I want to replace all with new this spring so I'm curious to hear how you did it.

 

TOH
Verified Newbie
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:02 am
Location: Mississauga
by TOH » Sun Jan 25, 2009 7:27 pm
Front Wheel Bearing Replacement Jig and Procedure:

I assume no liability for the contents of this document. The torque specifications were taken from my Saturn Chassis manual.

You can either purchase just the bearing (comes with a new snap ring) or a replacement bearing and hub as a kit. A new hub should be considered if the studs on the hub are damaged. Parts Source sells the bearing for about $45.00 and the kit for about $85.00.

Quick Description:

This jig consists of a steel framework that attaches to the steering knuckle on either the outer side to accommodate the removal of the wheel bearing or the inner side to accommodate the removal of the hub and the insertion of the new wheel bearing. A simple threaded rod jig is used to “draw” in the hub. The dimensions of the jig are based on the steering knuckle from my son’s 2000 SC2 and my 8” tall, 4 ton hydraulic jack.

Jig Construction Parts:

2 pcs 2.5” X .250” X 12” long steel hot rolled flat bar
2 pcs 1.250” X .250” X 18” long steel hot rolled flat bar
1 pcs 1.5” X .250” X 15” long steel hot rolled flat bar
1 pcs 4” X .5” X 4” long steel hot rolled flat bar
2 pcs 2” X 2” X .375” X 4” long steel hot rolled angle iron
1 pcs 3” X .375” X 3” long steel hot rolled flat bar
1 pcs 2” X .250” X 2” long steel hot rolled flat bar

All the above stuff is available at Metal Supermarkets for about $20.00
They will cut all the pieces to size for you!

Grade 5 bolts (cheapest ones) are good enough.

2 pcs 1/2-13 X 4” long bolts (Homely Depot part number 2762)
2 pcs 1/2-13 X 3” long bolts (Homely Depot part number 2760)
1 pcs 1/2-13 X 2.5” long bolt (Homely Depot part number 2759)
1 pcs 1/2-13 X 2” long bolt (Homely Depot part number 2757)
1 pcs 1/2-13 X 1.5” long bolt (Homely Depot part number 2756)

1 pcs 1/2-13 X 10” long threaded rod

9 pcs 1/2-13 nuts (Homely Depot part number 2604)
1 pcs 5/8 nut (Homely Depot part number 2606)
4 pcs 3/4 nuts (Homely Depot part number 2607)
8 pcs 1/2” flat washers (Homely Depot part number ????)

4 ton hydraulic bottle jack (mine is 8” tall collapsed)

Note:

If your bottle jack is taller, you will have to lengthen the 1.5” X .250” X 15” flat bar and the 2 pcs 1.250” X .250” X 18” flat bar and adjust the holes accordingly.

The 4 ton jack I used barely had enough pressure to push out the old bearing and press in the new one. A 12 ton jack might be a better choice. Princess Auto has a low profile 12 ton jack for $39.99 that is 8” tall. I do not believe a 2 ton bottle jack would work at all.

Drilling the Jig Parts:

You need to drill a total of 19, 1/2” holes in the metal parts. I strongly recommend the use of a drill press, but it could be done with a hand drill. If you are doing it with a hand drill, first drill a 1/8” pilot hole, then enlarge it with the 1/2:” bit. Also, if using a hand drill, consider using a 33/64” bit or 17/32” to allow clearance in the holes of the 1/2” bolts. It is unlikely the holes will be drilled exactly perpendicular to the material.


Using the 1.5” X .250” X 15” flat bar:

1) Drill first hole 1” from the end, centered in the bar.
2) Mark a line across the bar 2” from the same end. You will have to bend the bar 15 degrees on this mark once the holes are completed.
3) Drill second hole 11.375” (11 3/8”) from the same end.
4) Drill third hole 13.937 (13 15/16”) from the same end.
5) Mount the bar in a large, strong vice with 2” into the jaws and the remaining 13” exposed. I used a torch, but a big hammer will also allow you to make the required 15 degree bend.

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Using the 1.25” X .250” X 18” flat bar:

1) Drill first hole .750” (3/4”) from one end, centered in the bar.
2) Drill second hole 12.437” (12 7/16”) from the same end.
3) Drill third hole 17.312” (17 5/16”) from the same end.
4) Clamp the second 1.25” X .250” X 18” flat bar to the first bar.
5) Using the first bar as a drilling guide, make an exact second copy.

Image

Using the 2.5” X .250” X 12” flat bar:

1) Drill the first hole .750” (3/4”) from the end, and .750” (3/4”) from the edge.
2) Drill the second hole 11.250” (11 1/4”) from the same end, and .750” (3/4”) from the same edge.
3) Clamp the second 2.5” X .250” X 12” flat bar to the first bar.
4) Using the first bar as a drilling guide, make an exact second copy.

Image

Using the 2” X 2” X .375” X 4” angle iron:

1) Drill the first hole 2” from the end, 1” from the outside corner (i.e. centered in the angle iron.
2) Drill the second hole 2” from the same end, in the opposite surface, 1.250” (1 ¼”) from the outside corner (i.e. offset ¼” from the center towards the outside of the angle iron)
3) Clamp the second angle iron to the first piece.
4) Using the first piece as a drilling guide, make an exact second copy. You will have to re-clamp the first piece to the second to make the second hole.

Image

Using the 4” X .5” X 4” flat bar:

1) Drill the first hole .875” (7/8”) from the end and 2” from the edge (i.e. 7/8” from one end centered in the piece).
2) Drill the second hole 3.125” (3 1/8”) from the same end and 2” from the edge (i.e. 3 1/8” from the same end centered in the piece).

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Remove Steering Knuckle From Car:

1) Loosen the 4 wheel nuts and the axle nut prior to jacking the vehicle.
2) Jack vehicle and support it securely with axle stands under the frame.
3) Remove wheel (4 nuts).
4) Remove 2 bolts that attach the brake caliper support to the steering knuckle.
5) Hang the brake caliper and support bracket from the strut spring with wire (piece of coat hanger works good).
6) Remove rotor.
7) If you have ABS, remove sensor.
8) Remove outer tie rod end nut and separate it from the steering knuckle.
9) Remove 2 bolts connecting strut to steering knuckle.
10) Remove axle nut, tap end of axle with a wooden block and hammer to loosen it from the hub. Orient steering knuckle accordingly and disconnect axle from hub. Suspend loose end of axle with wire from strut spring.
11) Remove cotter pin from lower ball joint castle nut, remove nut and separate ball joint from steering knuckle.

Bearing Removal:

1) Assemble jig as per picture. Attach it to the steering knuckle on the inner side. Ensure that the flat bar that attaches to the lower strut hole and the flat bar that attaches to the lower ball joint hole are parallel to each other.

Image

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2) Note: Prior to removing the hub from the bearing, note its position in the bearing. This will enable you to tell when you have completely seated the hub back into the new bearing.
3) Using a socket with an outside diameter just less than 1.5” (1 1/2”) (I used a 26 mm socket), the 2” X 2” X 1/4” flat bar, and the hydraulic jack, press out the hub. It will not require much pressure to push it out.
4) Remove the jig from the steering knuckle.
5) Remove “C” clip holding bearing into steering knuckle. Use lots of penetrating oil and patience! You will likely destroy it in the process.
6) Using a small wire wheel on a drill, clean area where the “C” clip was to facilitate smooth bearing removal.
7) Assemble jig as per picture. Attach it to the steering knuckle on the outer side. Ensure that the flat bar that attaches to the lower strut hole and the flat bar that attaches to the lower ball joint hole are parallel to each other.

Image

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8) Using a socket with an outside diameter just less than 2” in diameter (I used a 36 mm socket), the 2” X 2” X 1/4” flat bar, and the hydraulic jack, press out the wheel bearing. Again, use plenty of penetrating oil as lube. Give it time to soak in. It will require a lot of pressure, close to the limit of the 4 ton jack (8,000 lbs), to press out the bearing.
9) WARNING: Because you must press out the bearing with pressure applied to the inner race, permanent damage will result (flattens the balls in the bearing). Do not attempt to re-use it!
10) Remove the jig from the steering knuckle.

Bearing Replacement:

1) Clean inside of steering knuckle where the bearing will be installed with a small wire wheel on a drill. Ensure groove where the “C” clip will be installed in free of debris. I broke off a small piece of the old “C” clip and using a pair of vice grips, used it as a scraper to clean out debris from the groove (just like using an old piston ring to clean the groves of a piston).
2) Warning: It is imperative that pressure only be applied to the outer race to press in the new bearing, otherwise, damage to it will occur (pressing on the inner race will put flat spots onto the balls). As I didn’t have a socket with the correct diameter, I used the old bearing as a sleeve to allow me to press in the new bearing. To facilitate this, I ground about .010” - .020” off the outer surface of the old bearing so that it would fit loosely into the steering knuckle. I also ground some of the inner race face surface off as well, to ensure it would not contact the inner race of the new bearing. The old bearing can now be used to press in the new bearing.
3) Assemble jig as per picture. Attach it to the steering knuckle on the inner side. Ensure that the flat bar that attaches to the lower strut hole and the flat bar that attaches to the lower ball joint hole are parallel to each other.

Image

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4) Lubricate the inside of the steering knuckle with a very small amount of penetrating oil.
5) Using the hydraulic jack, 2” X 2” X 1/4” flat bar, and the old bearing, press in the new bearing. It will require a lot of pressure, close to the limit of the 4 ton jack (8,000 lbs), to press in the bearing.
6) Remove the jig from the steering knuckle.
7) To install the new snap ring that came with the bearing, first apply a little wheel bearing grease (any type of thick grease will do) to the groove of the steering knuckle and the snap ring. Orient the snap ring so that the gap will be towards the top of the steering knuckle. This will prevent road debris and water from collecting in the groove. Once the ring is in place, fill the groove and coat the snap ring with more grease to deter rusting.
8) Clean the surface of the hub that mates to the bearing with a small wire wheel on a drill.
9) Assemble the threaded rod, socket washers and nuts as per the picture

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10) WARNING: You must only allow pressure to be applied to the inner race of the bearing while installing the hub, otherwise permanent damage to the bearing will occur. Ensure that the socket does not contact the bearing seal.
11) Use the threaded rod, 2 - 1/2” nuts, 6 washers (3 stacked at each end because they will bend), and a socket just less than 2” in diameter (I used a 36 mm socket) to install the hub onto the bearing, Again, use a very small amount of penetrating oil as lubricant. Ensure that the hub seats as best as possible, based upon your earlier observation prior to pressing it out.
12) Note: The hub will be properly seated into the bearing when the axle nut is torqued to 148 ft/lbs.



Re-install Steering Knuckle:

1) Place steering knuckle onto lower ball joint. To facilitate installation of the cotter pin, orient cotter pin hole so that it is parallel to the steering knuckle. Install castle nut. Torque to 55 ft/lbs, then continue to tighten it to align the castle nut with the cotter pin hole. Install cotter pin.
2) Install axle into hub. Install axle washer and a new nut. Tighten as much as practical to take up all the slack. Nut will be torqued to 148 ft/lbs once car is back on the ground.
3) Install 2 bolts connecting strut to steering knuckle. Torque to 126 ft/lbs.
4) Install tie rod end into steering knuckle. Using a new nut, torque to 19 ft/lbs, then an additional 134 degrees.
5) Install brake rotor onto hub.
6) If you have ABS, install sensor.
7) Install brake caliper mount bracket with 2 bolts onto steering knuckle. Torque to 81 ft/lbs.
8) Install wheel onto hub with 4 wheel nuts. Again, tighten as much as practical to take up all the slack. Nuts will be torqued once car is back on the ground.
9) Lower car to ground
10) Torque axle nut to 148 ft/lbs.
11) Torque wheel nut to 100ft/lbs (for aluminum wheels)

Now, the most important step:

Crack a cold one and admire your work!

Image
Slayer
O6P Staff
Posts: 1568
Joined: Sat Oct 14, 2006 5:33 pm
Location: Hamilton
 
by Slayer » Thu Jan 29, 2009 8:05 pm
TOH wrote:
If you wish a copy in the Word format, send me an email or PM with your email address and I can send it to you.


if you want to email me a copy i can create a PDF file for you in a couple seconds, so anyone can read it as long as they have adobe reader.. (and who doesnt now a days) slayer@idolcreations.com

 

Viperoni
onenut
Posts: 1667
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 10:44 am
Location: B-town, ON
 
by Viperoni » Thu Jan 29, 2009 8:31 pm
Wow TOH, that's a hell of a second post on a forum! lol

Thank you for the guide, that must have taken a long time write up.

 

Slayer
O6P Staff
Posts: 1568
Joined: Sat Oct 14, 2006 5:33 pm
Location: Hamilton
 
by Slayer » Sun Feb 01, 2009 2:19 pm
a link to a zipped PDF file was added in the first post
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kuchnie na wymiar radomsko

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